Posts tagged ‘diy’

Stabmixer – Electric Outboard Project

Ever since I was a kid, i wanted an electric outboard motor to use with a light rubber boat (without a hard floor). I actually even started experimenting when i was 12, but that didn’t work out at all.

Now, many years later, I wanted to give it a try again, my goal was a lightweight electric outboard, driving a chain inside a tube down to the propeller. Unfortunately, it all went wrong after I’ve made a prototype that was running the chain directly through the water. It worked so well, that I’ve decided to keep the chain outside. What I built is good for more than 1kw, but my intex excursion has it’s limits at around 6kph, which requires roughly 400watts.

The part’s I’ve used are:

Battery: 12s4p 18650 High drain (powertool) cells.
Motor: Chinese no-name Hub, good for about 1000w continues
Gear Ratio: 22×14
Propeller: JXF 15×13 / 381 x 330mm
Other Parts: Aluminium Rods, Steel Plates, Road frame parts, Buttom Bracket, Bolts, Nuts, Washers, Stem, Handlebar.

Be sure to check out the videos:

 

Blendwirkung V2 – The Uetliberg descent bike light

Blendwirkung V1 was a road light, that was built based on a Luxeon 1 LED (which was relatively new back then in ~2005). I have used it for a while, until I’ve decided that it was just too big and heavy.

Many years later, after I’ve moved my Magicshine from the handlebar to the helmet, and added the beautiful Lux-RC / Easy2Led Light to the handlebar. I began to think about a cordless solution on the helmet, as I really didn’t like the battery in the backpack, running a cable to the helmet. I’ve decided to go old school with this, and use NiMH, as I don’t want any LiXX battery on my helmet. This could be paranoid, but I just don’t like the idea at all.

 

 

I only use this light for the descent of our weekly Uetliberg-Run, so runtime wasn’t a big criteria.  I just wanted high output for about 20minutes on the existing 2/3 sub C NiMH cells that I’ve had lying arround. In the end I went for these components:

  • 2x Nanjg 110 Boost driver, ~950mA each – so Output is almost 2A
  • 1x CREE XM-L2 T6 4C LED – this is warm white, you gotta love it in the woods.
  • 1x TIR Optic, it’s either 20 or 25 degree, I don’t remember.
  • 2x 2500 mAh Sub-C NiMH high power cells.
  • Various Alloy sheet + part of an old heatsink

The light pulls arround 6Amps from the battery, which makes it difficult to find a good switch, since the one I initially installed was fried after about 10 toggles, I’ve removed it and don’t have a switch at the moment. It’s no beauty, but its brighter than most other lights I’ve seen on the Uetliberg, and it was most likely the cheapest as well. Have been using it many times – still love it. This light cannot be used stationary, as it needs some air flow to keep the temperature down.

A new case for an old Squeezebox (v1) – The SpaceDock

SpaceDock1

When one of my V3  Squeezeboxes died recently, it meant that I’ll have to find a solution for the sticky (probably the softeners in went crazy after all those years) case of the working v1 unit, that I was given by a friend. The whole case was so sticky, I did not see any solution in reusing it (others have had the same issue).

Anyway, I have decided to draw an acrylic plate that a friend who owns a company that has a co2 laser can then cut for me. That plate with the attached Squeezebox internals + some magnets went behind a cabinet, so that only the display + IR receiver is visible.

The name SpaceDock is coincidence, it’s the name of the track that was playing.

Squeezebox Boom DIY wall mount made of bicycle parts

I finally got myself a SB Boom for the bedroom. It was clear that I need some kind of a wall-mount, and as the Boom has 4 mounting holes, that didn’t seem to be too complicated. Only problem here is the threading, seems to be 2 or 2.5mm (sorry didn’t measure), I have found some screws out of an old computer hard drive that fit.
The mount itself is made of 2 bicycle stems, connected through a piece of 1 1/8″ steering tube of a fork.

Having a cold beer on a boat.

I prefer having a cold beer when I’m on our boat, but since this is usually on the sunny days, the performance of our fridge (Waeco CF-18) was too weak to cool one down in a short time (temperature in the cabin goes up to ~35° C if the sun is burning down).

I’ve been thinking about some kind of a GSM-based remote control, and actually found a nice product called microguard. The product seemed perfect, relatively cheap, easy to implement, available, but there was no time-out that could be set. Even if I have a separate starter-battery, it was key to find a solution that turns off the fridge after a given time without user interaction. Luckily, the guy who runs microguard was very cooperative, and added a timeout feature for me (and everyone else of course).

The module now turns on a relay for two hours after it’s been called from my or one of 4 other predefined phones. this is a bit on the short side, but I can live with calling twice.

This is how my installation looks:

From left to right:
Charge split diode / Rear side of main switches / Fridge fuse / Microguard module with relays, cables, mounted on an a plastic case / RedBull cup as holder for a Siemens S45.
The Cat5 network cabling goes directly to the voltmeters on the dash, this was made to show the exact voltage without loss due to load on the cabling.

As mentioned before, I have two separate batteries the starter is a traditional lead/acid battery, and the domestic is an AGM type, which allows deep cycles.

This is how the battery compartment looks:

 

The switches on the left are starter / jumper / domestic. This allows maximum flexibility. The domestic main switch actually doesn’t kill the microguard / fridge, so it can be off, and I can still call the fridge.