Archive for the ‘Repair’ Category.

Makita 9500d Cordless Angle Grinder on Steroids

I wanted one for a long time, but getting one wasn’t easy. I don’t think that they were good sellers at all, most of them most likely went to trash several years ago. Anyway, I was able to find one on ebay kleinanzeigen in Germany. Seller told that it is in good working condition, battery was missing, and the shield was missing as well. I didn’t care for the battery, as I wanted to do a Li-Ion conversion. For the shield, I’ve found a solution on Aliexpress, the Chinese sell shields that you can attach to your drill, and then do ridiculous things with it… It was quite easy to adapt one to the Makita.

When I got it, I tested it out with

my existing Makita NiMH battery, the performance was a lot worse than expected, and the motor was pretty worn, or at least it sounded like that. I looked in my parts that I’ve salvaged from cordless drills, and found a matching motor out of a green bosch drill (don’t remember the model, but it was a 12v NiCD model that I got for free because of the dead battery). This one felt quite beefy (strong magnets, compared to the original), and felt like new. I’ve removed the pinions and pushed the Makita pinion to the Bosch motor using my vice.

I’ve built a battery out of 3 18650 cells (Warning: you need to know what you’re doing, you cannot use normal 18650 cells, it needs to be high discharge cells – like the ones used in cordless tools). There’s no over discharge protection, I’m able to handle this by myself, worst case I would have to replace the battery, if  I run it too low.

Makita 9500D Complete

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BionX 250HT hub motor bearing replacement / disassembly, reassembly

The bearings in my BionX hub motor began to die at around 6500km, and now completely worn out at around 9500km. The wheel had a lot of play, and power consumption went up by about 30-40%. Surprisingly, I couldn’t find a lot of info on the web.

As always, this is not a complete guide, but I try to point out those parts of the procedure that were not straight forward to me. If you’ve done it yourself and have something to contribute, please do so using the comments function.

Tools / Parts needed:

  • Bearings:  SS 6003 2RS   Stainless Steel 17 x 35 x 10 mm
  • Strain Gauge: Mine survived
  • M8 bolts + nuts or similar, as tool (see below)
  • Freewheel removal tool
  • Spoke key
  • Hydraulic press
  • Bearing puller
  • Straight puller

I didn’t do it in the same order as I recommend here, but I think this is the best order to do it.

First step – Take the hub apart:

Remove the Freewheel

Remove the torque blocker (pressed onto the axle, brake side). Mine was just cone-shaped, but the newer ones seem to have a notch, so don’t try to rotate it, use a straight puller to remove it.

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Remove the spokes on the brake side, this should suffice / I’ve left the drive side spokes in place. Mark the hub, so that you know how to align the halves when reassembling. I’ve used 9 M8 bolts and nuts to actually press on the inner walls of the hub shells. It was surprisingly easy to get it apart by doing so.

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Second Step – Remove the bearings:

The bearing on the brake side covers the strain gauge, which measures torque applied through the pedals. I have read, that this will usually break during disassemble – luckily mine didnt. The bearing came off the axle / stayed in the hub shell. Getting it out of the shell was a job for a hammer + some alloy tubing.

To remove the drive side from the inner part of the motor, we have used a hydraulic press (sorry I somehow missed to take pictures). So this wasn’t easy, and I needed help from someone with the right tools. It eventually came out, and the bearing stayed on the axle.

Removing that bearing is quite difficult, as you don’t have much room below it, to actually use a puller tool. Luckily the mechanic had something like this (with barely enough room to house the cables while pulling):

9082A

 

Third Step – Reassembly:

 

With that bearing out of the way, it was time to clean the axles, place the new bearings onto the shaft. Add new silicone to protect the strain gauge, as well as replacing any heat shrink that has been removed. I then continued with adding the brake / magnetic side, but I’m not sure if it wouldn’t be easier to first push the axle onto the brake side, as there’s no magnetic involved.

Anyway, since I was back at my workshop, I didn’t have the hydraulic press available, and I’ve used my bench vice to gently press the hub halves together (lots of rotating / small steps were involved).

Add spokes, true the wheel go for a ride.

Conclusion:

It’s running smooth again, so it was worth it. It took me about 5 hours to do it, If I’ve had the right tools from the beginning, it would have been much less. So if you want to do this, be sure that you have access to the right tools.

A new case for an old Squeezebox (v1) – The SpaceDock

SpaceDock1

When one of my V3  Squeezeboxes died recently, it meant that I’ll have to find a solution for the sticky (probably the softeners in went crazy after all those years) case of the working v1 unit, that I was given by a friend. The whole case was so sticky, I did not see any solution in reusing it (others have had the same issue).

Anyway, I have decided to draw an acrylic plate that a friend who owns a company that has a co2 laser can then cut for me. That plate with the attached Squeezebox internals + some magnets went behind a cabinet, so that only the display + IR receiver is visible.

The name SpaceDock is coincidence, it’s the name of the track that was playing.

Seafarer D800 Echo Sounder repair

On our boat, we have an old Seafarer D800 echo sounder. The device slowly stopped working two years ago, the depth it was able to measure went smaller and smaller, in the end it couldn’t measure at all, even if the depth was only two meters.

I’ve missed to take pictures, but the repair was very simple. There are to caps inside, at least one of them is 1uf 63v, electrolyte was leaking on one side, so I was pretty sure that it’s not good anymore. I’ve decided to replace it (only had a 1uf 50v available), and this did the trick. While I was at it, I’ve also cleaned the mode button (realized, that it was stuck), and cleaned the two pots (both are working much better now).

It is now working as it should again, I was able to measure up to 80 meters (limited by the depth, not by the sounder)!

Happy boating, the season just started here.

 

Hugsby P31 Disassembly / Driver replacement / All flood MOD

In case you’ve ever wondered how to disassemble the Hugsby P31, here’s how it goes:
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I did that because of a malfunctioning driver, and while i was at it, I’ve replaced the reflector with an all flood TIR lens. This makes the little Hugsby a perfect near field flashlight.

V-Zug Adora – Fehler 1 – Temperaturfühler defekt

Kürzlich hat meine V-Zug Adora 55 Geschirrspühlmaschine den Dienst mit F1 – Fehler 1 verweigert. Das Handbuch beschreibt leider nur den Fehler 8 (zugeführtes Wasser zu heiss). Meine E-Mail Anfrage bei V-Zug wurde schnell und kompetent beantwortet:
“Wassertemperaturmessung fehlerhaft” Was wiederum nicht heissen muss, dass es der Sensor ist, aber die Wahrscheinlichkeit ist hoch. Das Teil habe ich darauf ausgebaut, befindet sich im unteren Bereich, an dem man durch entfernen der Front + einer weiteren Abdeckung herankommt. Leider ist das von V-Zug verbaute Teil ohne Typenbezeichnung, die deutsche Konkurenz verbaut ein physikalisch baugleiches Teil, aber wie ich herausfinden musste mit anderen Werten. Erneut bei V-Zug angefragt, die Teilenummer ist: P59013 – mit Versand hat mich das Teil CHF 21.20 gekostet (was ich sehr fair finde).

Die Bezeichnung auf der Rechnung ist:
Temperaturfühler NTC 100K Ohm / max. 100°C Stahlgehäuse
Bei Raumtemperatur ergab meine Messung ca. 140kOhm. Mein defektes Bauteil lässt sich nicht mehr messen (widerstand unendlich hoch).

Gerne würde ich hier eine Liste mit weiteren V-Zug Fehlercodes publizieren, falls jemand etwas weiss bitte über Komentar bei mir melden.

Trisa Elektrozahnbürste AA Mod

This article is about a swiss product, which I don’t think is very common outside Switzerland, so I’m writing in German.

Als ich mir die Elektrische Zahnbürste von Trisa gekauft hatte viel meine Wahl auf dieses Modell, weil ich weder Platz noch Lust auf eine Ladestation hatte. Das Konzept aufladen und leerbrauchen hat mir da einiges mehr zugesagt. Am liebsten hätte ich jedoch eine Zahnbürste gekauft, die mit einer herkömlichen AA Batterie / Akku betrieben wird.

Letzte Woche ist mir die Trisa aus unerklärlichen Gründen ausgestiegen. Ich habe dann am Ladeanschluss mit einer Zange die Platine inkl. Akku rausgerissen. Eigentlich mit der Idee das Teil zu reparieren, doch der AA gedanke war schnell wieder da. Kurz eine Batterie reingesteckt, passt perfekt, nur findet auf der Vorderseite kein Kontakt statt. Es fehlten einige Milimeter beim Minus-Pol, welcher in der Bürste sitzt. Ein Quadratischer Neodym Magnet mit 7mm Seitenlänge war schnell zur Hand, und stellt nun den kontakt her.

Die Zahnbürste läuft nun perfekt mit einem AA Akku.